friendsofaiweiwei:

“Concentrate on what you want to say to yourself and your friends. Follow your inner moonlight; don’t hide the madness. You say what you want to say when you don’t care who’s listening.” 
Allen Ginsberg - Legendary friend of free expression.

friendsofaiweiwei:

“Concentrate on what you want to say to yourself and your friends. Follow your inner moonlight; don’t hide the madness. You say what you want to say when you don’t care who’s listening.” 

Allen Ginsberg - Legendary friend of free expression.



myarmisnotalilactree:

Salvador Dalí

myarmisnotalilactree:

Salvador Da



There is only one valuable thing in art: the thing you cannot explain.
Georges Braque (via amare-habeo)


(Source: imminentdeathsyndrome)



scottbergeyart:

# 1082 “Genau” on Flickr.
Scott Bergey

scottbergeyart:

# 1082 “Genau” on Flickr.

Scott Bergey



theoddmentemporium:

Victorian Pictogram Puzzle
Pictograms were a popular form of entertainment in the Victorian era and some came with an especial incentive to solve them - like the promise of an ‘Earthly paradise’ or the chance to win £30,000.
The above poster was designed by Thomas Bish, who pioneered new ways of advertising lottery tickets before the lottery was abolished by parliament in 1826. It reads:

"Catch Fortune when you can.  As every man would rather get money than not, the attention of all is called to the New Lottery, in which, by a small risk, they may get an independent fortune. They should hasten to the nearest lottery office, and then, by purchasing even a share, they may secure what they desire, and which cannot fail to make the mare go, and place them (if money be their deity) in an earthly paradise."
And the address at the bottom is for BISH, 4 Cornhill and 9 Charing Cross, London.

[Secret Lives of Objects]

theoddmentemporium:

Victorian Pictogram Puzzle

Pictograms were a popular form of entertainment in the Victorian era and some came with an especial incentive to solve them - like the promise of an ‘Earthly paradise’ or the chance to win £30,000.

The above poster was designed by Thomas Bish, who pioneered new ways of advertising lottery tickets before the lottery was abolished by parliament in 1826. It reads:

"Catch Fortune when you can.  As every man would rather get money than not, the attention of all is called to the New Lottery, in which, by a small risk, they may get an independent fortune. They should hasten to the nearest lottery office, and then, by purchasing even a share, they may secure what they desire, and which cannot fail to make the mare go, and place them (if money be their deity) in an earthly paradise."

And the address at the bottom is for BISH, 4 Cornhill and 9 Charing Cross, London.

[Secret Lives of Objects]



likeafieldmouse:

Nick Veasey

likeafieldmouse:

Nick Veasey




allthateverwasorwillbe:

Etienne Leopold Trouvelot.

Direct electric spark obtained with a Ruhmkorff coil or Wimshurst machine, also known as a “Trouvelot Figure.” Photograph, c. 1888.

Fleeting moments in an infinite flux: artists and other windows on eternity

by Emily Ann Pothast

In the late 1880s, the French astronomer and artist Etienne Leopold Trouvelot created a series of photographs of electric sparks. Perfecting a technique pioneered by another scientist a few years earlier, Trouvelot generated his images without a camera, directly exposing photosensitive plates to brief bursts of electrical energy. The resulting snapshots reveal forking, infinitely self-similar patterns that resemble tree branches, rivers, vascular systems, coral, neurons, city maps, mountain ranges, microchips, mycorrhizal networks, galaxies, flow charts, family trees and feathers—basically everything in the universe whose structure is determined by growth, movement or the transfer of energy.

You can read the rest of this essay HERE




amcq:

Pet Sematary II (1992)



beryl-azure:

Josef Sudek, Detail with Baroque Wing 

beryl-azure:

Josef Sudek, Detail with Baroque Wing 

(Source: ixj)



To think is not to get out of the cave; it is not to replace the uncertainty of shadows by the clear-cut outlines of things themselves, the flame’s flickering glow by the light of the true sun. To think is to enter the Labyrinth; more exactly, it is to make be and appear a Labyrinth when we might have stayed “lying among the flowers, facing the sky.” It is to lose oneself amidst galleries which exist only because we never tire of digging them; to turn round and round at the end of a cul-de-sac whose entrance has been shut off behind us—until, inexplicably, this spinning round opens up in the surrounding walls cracks which offer passage.
Crossroads in the Labyrinth, Cornelius Castoriadis, 1978 (via outdarethenight)


(Source: alexej)



I mean if I have to drink shitty American water piss “beer” go big or go home rite (at Hillsmere)

I mean if I have to drink shitty American water piss “beer” go big or go home rite (at Hillsmere)



thearksakura:

Kiki Smith
Hard and Soft Bodies

thearksakura:

Kiki Smith

Hard and Soft Bodies



movieposteroftheday:

1969 70mm re-launch poster for 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (Stanley Kubrick, USA/UK, 1968)
Art Director: Mike Kaplan
Poster source: Heritage Auctions
“When MGM decided to re-launch the 70mm prints of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey into New York theatres, the studio decided to revamp the ad campaign as well. The film had been in continuous release since April 1968 and due to that popularity, the studio decided it was time to refresh the ads. The two new posters that were created capitalized on the film’s surreal ending and the news that young people were flocking to the film. The tag line, “The Ultimate Trip” was used and the posters were distributed in a campaign in New York City where the posters were “wilded” onto walls, fences, and construction sight barricades.” –Heritage Auctions
“The Star Child image was selected by Kaplan to re-launch Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece in its full 70mm technical presentation, the format in which the film was meant to be experienced by new and returning audiences. Kubrick had placed an embargo on using the Star Child in any publicity so its appearance in print and poster a year after 2001’s premiere was startling, conveying an immediate human dimension to his epic vision. The unprecedented re-launch was enormously successful, and with THE ULTIMATE TRIP slogan, cemented its recognition as a cultural phenomenon.” –Mike Kaplan, The Movie Posters
Happy Birthday Stanley Kubrick, born July 26, 1928

movieposteroftheday:

1969 70mm re-launch poster for 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (Stanley Kubrick, USA/UK, 1968)

Art Director: Mike Kaplan

Poster source: Heritage Auctions

“When MGM decided to re-launch the 70mm prints of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey into New York theatres, the studio decided to revamp the ad campaign as well. The film had been in continuous release since April 1968 and due to that popularity, the studio decided it was time to refresh the ads. The two new posters that were created capitalized on the film’s surreal ending and the news that young people were flocking to the film. The tag line, “The Ultimate Trip” was used and the posters were distributed in a campaign in New York City where the posters were “wilded” onto walls, fences, and construction sight barricades.” –Heritage Auctions

“The Star Child image was selected by Kaplan to re-launch Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece in its full 70mm technical presentation, the format in which the film was meant to be experienced by new and returning audiences. Kubrick had placed an embargo on using the Star Child in any publicity so its appearance in print and poster a year after 2001’s premiere was startling, conveying an immediate human dimension to his epic vision. The unprecedented re-launch was enormously successful, and with THE ULTIMATE TRIP slogan, cemented its recognition as a cultural phenomenon.” –Mike Kaplan, The Movie Posters

Happy Birthday Stanley Kubrick, born July 26, 1928